FINANCIAL AID

Regardless of your financial standing, we are committed to making education attainable for you. As a residential college, Wartburg supports the concept of a socially, culturally, and economically diverse student body and believes this diversity better prepares students for society. The college provides financial aid to enable students from all segments of society to attend. Wartburg believes that students should be able to select a school for academic rather than financial reasons. It admits students on academic and personal promise, not the ability to pay.

Planning in advance is important when preparing for college. Financial aid is intended to supplement, not replace, a family’s resources. Colleges, government agencies, and special programs that award aid expect you and your family to contribute as much as possible toward college costs. Members of the Wartburg Financial Aid staff are happy to discuss your questions and concerns about financial aid.

The 2017-18 FAFSA will allow students to report tax information from a prior-prior tax year (PPY), allowing tax information from two years ago.  This will also allow students and their families to fill out the FAFSA earlier.  You can complete your 2017-18 FAFSA as early as October 1, 2016 at www.fafsa.ed.gov.  Our office highly recommends using IRS Data Retrieval to ensure correct tax information is used.

Contact Us: (319) 352-8262 or finaid@wartburg.edu

Wartburg offers financial aid estimates for students who apply and are accepted before December 1 of their senior year in high school.

CSO_COALITION

Apply for Financial Aid

Step 1 – Apply for admission. To be considered for financial aid, you must first be accepted for admission to Wartburg College.

Step 2 – File a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after Oct. 1 in your senior year. For priority consideration, you should file before Nov 1. Be sure to list Wartburg College code #001896. If you are an Iowa resident, check the state release box. You are encouraged to apply over the Internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov. In order to sign your FAFSA electronically, you and your parent must have a FSA ID. Paper forms are available for those without access to the Internet by calling 1-800-433-3243.

Step 3 – If requested, submit an IRS Tax Return Transcript and completed Verification Worksheet to the Wartburg College Financial Aid Office.

Step 4 – First-year students will be sent an email approximately 7-10 days prior to the student’s S.O.A.R. (Student Orientation And Registration) Day. A checklist will contain directions and information to be completed and returned on or before your scheduled S.O.A.R. day.

Step 5 – Apply for other aid from your high school, church, civic organizations, clubs, or other sources. Notify the Financial Aid Office of all additional scholarships you receive.

Educational Tax Credits
Hope and Lifetime Learning
Frequently Asked Questions

WORK ON CAMPUS

 Wartburg students can gain practical, hands-on experience and earn a little extra cash when they work on campus. Sample positions include marketing photographer, web developer, social media manager, baker, technical theatre staff, information desk receptionist, Sir Victor (mascot), ITS technical support, lifeguard, Resident Assistant, and more.

Gaining experience and a leg up on the competition. WORTH IT.

LEARN MORE

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FINANCIAL AID TOP 5

TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID

FINANCIAL AID QUESTIONS

TYPES OF AID

If a student is eligible, there are two types of financial aid that he/she can expect to receive.

Gift Aid, which comes in the form of grants and scholarships and does not need to be repaid. This type of aid may be awarded on the basis of need or merit.

Self Help Aid, which comes in the form of loans and on-campus employment. Loans need to be repaid when a student graduates or leaves school for an extended length of time. Interest rates on these loans are generally lower than commercial loans. Students can work in various departments on campus up to 20 hours per week. Almost 75% of Wartburg students are employed on campus.

Financial Literacy

What IS Financial Literacy:  Financial Literacy has become quite the buzz term on college campuses.  In a nutshell, Financial Literacy is defined as possession of knowledge and understanding of financial matters.  More specifically, it refers to the set of skills and knowledge that allows an individual to make informed and effective decisions through their understanding of finances.  It is our goal at Wartburg College to provide our students with the tools and knowledge they need to make sound financial decisions during their college careers as well as after they graduate.  Here are some statistics:

  • Finances are the #1 reason that students withdraw from college and what gives them the most stress.
  • A study of 1,065 teens found that 21% of 18 and 19-year olds have credit cards.
  • People in the 18 to 24 age bracket spend nearly 30% of their monthly income just on debt repayment, double the percentage spent in 1992 (10% of net income is a recommended amount for debt obligation).
  • The average 21 year-old in the U.S. will spend more than 2.2 million in their lifetime.
  • 40% of Americans say they live beyond their means.
  • The average household with debt carries approximately $10,000 to $12,000 in total revolving debt and has nine credit cards.
  • 45% of college students are in credit card debt, the average credit card debt being more than $3,000.
  • The number of 18-24-year-olds declaring bankruptcy has increased 96% in 10 years.
  • In 2002, more people filed for bankruptcy than graduated from college in 2002.
  • Personal bankruptcies nearly doubled in the past decade, including more than 1.6 million people who filed for personal bankruptcy in 2003.
  • Home foreclosures in 2002 reached the highest rate in 30 years.

To keep up to date on the latest information regarding the Financial Literacy program at Wartburg, please look us up on Facebook and “like” us.